Rep. Danny K. Davis Statement on Justice Ginsburg

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September 21, 2020
Statements
I know that in the Jewish tradition those who die at the New Year, Rosh Hashanah, are considered special.  Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was certainly special.  Diminutive in physical size, she was a giant in the struggle for equality, a giant in the struggle for justice to perfect our democracy.  She was the embodiment of the commandment ‘justice, justice, you shall pursue,’ which, I understand, hung in her chambers in Hebrew.
 
Whoever replaces her has giant shoes to fill.  We are in the midst of historic popular upsurge in reasserting and expanding that democracy in the most inclusive manner in every corner of our nation comparable to the American Revolution, the Civil War, the Reconstruction, the Civil Rights movement.  We are, not coincidently, also in the midst of an historic election.  Filling her shoes belongs, and should belong, to the American people through our constitutional right and responsibility to regularly evaluate and select our leaders at the ballot box.  That right should certainly extend to our Supreme Court whose members enjoy the extraordinary privilege and responsibly of serving for life. The appointment of Justice Ginsburg’s replacement belongs exclusively to the next President and the next Senate, freely and democratically chosen by the American people.I know that in the Jewish tradition those who die at the New Year, Rosh Hashanah, are considered special.  Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was certainly special.  Diminutive in physical size, she was a giant in the struggle for equality, a giant in the struggle for justice to perfect our democracy.  She was the embodiment of the commandment ‘justice, justice, you shall pursue,’ which, I understand, hung in her chambers in Hebrew.
I know that in the Jewish tradition those who die at the New Year, Rosh Hashanah, are considered special.  Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was certainly special.  Diminutive in physical size, she was a giant in the struggle for equality, a giant in the struggle for justice to perfect our democracy.  She was the embodiment of the commandment ‘justice, justice, you shall pursue,’ which, I understand, hung in her chambers in Hebrew.
 
Whoever replaces her has giant shoes to fill.  We are in the midst of an historic popular upsurge in reasserting and expanding our democracy in a scope comparable to the American Revolution, the Civil War, the Reconstruction, the Civil Rights movement.  We are, not coincidently, also in the midst of an historic election.  Filling her shoes belongs, and should belong, to the American people through our constitutional right and responsibility to regularly evaluate and select our leaders at the ballot box.  That right should certainly extend to our Supreme Court whose members enjoy the extraordinary privilege and responsibility of serving for life. The appointment of Justice Ginsburg’s replacement belongs exclusively to the next President and the next Senate, freely and democratically chosen by the American people.I know that in the Jewish tradition those who die at the New Year, Rosh Hashanah, are considered special.  Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was certainly special.  Diminutive in physical size, she was a giant in the struggle for equality, a giant in the struggle for justice to perfect our democracy.  She was the embodiment of the commandment ‘justice, justice, you shall pursue,’ which, I understand, hung in her chambers in Hebrew.
I know that in the Jewish tradition those who die at the New Year, Rosh Hashanah, are considered special.  Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was certainly special.  Diminutive in physical size, she was a giant in the struggle for equality, a giant in the struggle for justice to perfect our democracy.  She was the embodiment of the commandment ‘justice, justice, you shall pursue,’ which, I understand, hung in her chambers in Hebrew.
 
Whoever replaces her has giant shoes to fill.  We are in the midst of an historic popular upsurge in reasserting and expanding our democracy in a scope comparable to the American Revolution, the Civil War, the Reconstruction, the Civil Rights movement.  We are, not coincidently, also in the midst of an historic election.  Filling her shoes belongs, and should belong, to the American people through our constitutional right and responsibility to regularly evaluate and select our leaders at the ballot box.  That right should certainly extend to our Supreme Court whose members enjoy the extraordinary privilege and responsibility of serving for life. The appointment of Justice Ginsburg’s replacement belongs exclusively to the next President and the next Senate, freely and democratically chosen by the American people.